avianawareness
avianawareness:

Think live chicks shouldn’t be discarded into trash bags and dumpsters simply because they’ve been born male? Tell the egg industry you won’t support this by leaving eggs off your plate.
“Is there any company that sells eggs that does not use this practice?”
If you have a friend with rescue chickens that lays eggs. Whenever chickens are bred for the industry, you’re going to have males, they’re separated, then discarded in horrible ways.

avianawareness:

Think live chicks shouldn’t be discarded into trash bags and dumpsters simply because they’ve been born male? Tell the egg industry you won’t support this by leaving eggs off your plate.

Is there any company that sells eggs that does not use this practice?”

If you have a friend with rescue chickens that lays eggs. Whenever chickens are bred for the industry, you’re going to have males, they’re separated, then discarded in horrible ways.

lost-moonlight
theenergyissue:

Hyperlapse of the Supermoon over Los Angeles
The TimeLAX project, started by video-making duo RandyFX and RandyGM, is a growing archive of timelapse photography of the Los Angeles metropolitan area. In a recent video made for the project, the so-called “supermoon” from August 10, 2014, can be seen rising eerily over the electrified cityscape. A supermoon occurs when a full moon or a new moon is at the point of its elliptal orbit when it is closest to Earth, resulting in a super-sized appearance. According to NASA, the moon appears 14% larger and 30% brighter than it does when farthest from the Earth. Though supermoons have been associated with increased risk of events such as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, there is no scientific evidence to back up this claim. Incidentally, the next and closest supermoon of the year will be tonight, September 9, 2014, so remember to keep an eye out.

theenergyissue:

Hyperlapse of the Supermoon over Los Angeles

The TimeLAX project, started by video-making duo RandyFX and RandyGM, is a growing archive of timelapse photography of the Los Angeles metropolitan area. In a recent video made for the project, the so-called “supermoon” from August 10, 2014, can be seen rising eerily over the electrified cityscape. A supermoon occurs when a full moon or a new moon is at the point of its elliptal orbit when it is closest to Earth, resulting in a super-sized appearance. According to NASA, the moon appears 14% larger and 30% brighter than it does when farthest from the Earth. Though supermoons have been associated with increased risk of events such as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, there is no scientific evidence to back up this claim. Incidentally, the next and closest supermoon of the year will be tonight, September 9, 2014, so remember to keep an eye out.